Army MFT Master Fitness Trainer course Phase 2 - Day 7/8/9

Army MFT Day 7/10 consisted of starting in the lab and going through the proper Squat movement.

 

To Start:

  • Stand with your feet slightly wider than your hips.
  • Your toes should be pointed slightly outward – about 5 to 20 degrees outward (the wider your stance, the more you’ll want to rotate your feet outward).
  • Look straight ahead and pick a spot on the wall in front of you.
  • Look at this spot the entire time you squat, not looking down at the floor or up at the ceiling.

 

Your weight is on your feet, it should be distributed on the heels and the balls of your feet.

Keep your entire core tight the entire time, your core flexed as if you’re bracing to be punched in the gut!

 

Breathe deeply into your stomach, HINGE at your hip and push your butt back. Keep sending your hips backwards as your knees begin to bend.

  • It’s important to start with your hips back, and not by bending your knees.

 

As you squat down, focus on keep your knees in line with your feet.

  • Many new lifters need to focus on pushing their knees out so they track with their feet.
  • When your knees start to come inside the toes, push them out (but not wider than your feet).[2]
  • Make sure your knees aren’t moving inward toward each other through the movement – this is very common. 

Squat down until your hip joint is lower than your knees (“parallel” to the ground.

 

Exercise Physiology - The study of the acute responses and chronic adaptations to exercise

 

Science of Overload - The Overload Principle is a basic sports fitness training concept. It means that in order to improve, athletes must continually work harder as they their bodies adjust to existing workouts. ... If the training load was not increased to push him to higher levels of strength, he would show little improvement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aerobic - with oxygen

Anaerobic - without oxygen

*THIS INFORMATION SHOULD BE FAMILIAR IF YOU READ THE OTHER BLOGS, BUT IT BRINGS IT ALL TOGETHER. *

 

Body uses ATP for energy

Anaerobic      

anaerobic glycolysis

Phosphagen

aerobic glycolysis

beta oxidation

Creatine phosphate

carbohydrates

fat

intensity

 

Intensity.           Fast twitch                                                                                         

Time

 

0-10 seconds               30 sec- 2 min                          3 min- 2 hours            30 min-3+ hours        

 

 

Phosphagen

Energy source? Creatine phosphate

Oxygen Required? no!!

Duration? Up to 10 seconds

 

Anaerobic Glycolysis

Energy source? Glycogen / Glucose

Oxygen Required? no!!

ATP Duration? 30 sec to 2 minutes

 

Aerobic Respiration: Aerobic Glycolysis

Energy source? Glycogen / Glucose

Oxygen Required? yes!!

ATP Duration? 3 min to 3 hours

 

Aerobic Respiration: Beta Oxidation

Energy source? Fat Oxygen

Oxygen gly3

Required? yes!!

ATP Duration? 20 min - 3+ hours

 

 

 

 

 


UPPER BODY

PUSH/PULL

CORE

 

SUSPENDED

STRENGTH

GRIP

SCAPULA

 

POWER

PLYOMETRICS

SHOULDER

MOBILITY

 

UPPER BODY

PUSH/PULL

CORE

 

HRPU

 

SDC

 

SPT

 

LTK

 

2MR

 

MDL

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

RUNNING: sadly, enough in the Army we run at least 3 days per week, but never receive any formal running instruction on proper form. Plenty of us have either suffered from shin splints, fallen arches, knee/hip pain from running improperly.

 

FOOT STRIKE PATTERNS

Runners strike the ground in different patterns, and each runner has pattern determined by their mobility, strength, speed and type of shoes they wear.

  • Rearfoot/Heel strike - Initial contact of the foot as at the heel. Ankle is dorsiflexed in this pattern. Since load is not on the foot, but only on the heel. Achilles tendon is not actively engaged in this strike. This pattern often correlated with overstriding. In heel strikers, there is signficant load on shins, often causing shin splints.
  • Midfoot stirke - Initial contact is at the middle of the foot. Ankle is in neutral position. Load is distributed evenly across the foot. Midfoot strike is considered as metabolically economical.
  • Forefoot strike - Initial contact is at the ball of the foot. Ankle is plantarflexed. Achilles tendon is actively engaged in this pattern, and elastic energy stored in the foot when landing, is utilized better. Hence making this strike more efficient for speed. Sprinters often use this pattern.                                                                                                                                                                           

Injuries - Those with heel strike and forefoot strike might want to consider changing to midfoot, if there are frequent injuries such as shin splints, calf pains, plantar issues.

Performance - Midfoot and forefoot strike are associated with less ground contact time. Those with performance focus might want to consider switching to midfoot and forefoot strike.

Day 8

 

Today consisted of combat readiness for profiles/injuries.

 

Combat Readiness is the Army’s primary focus; these are our Special Conditioning Programs:

  1. Reconditioning
  2. ACFT or unit PRT goal failures
  3. Army Body Composition Program (ABCP)
  4. Pregnancy and Postpartum Physical Training (P3T)

DEPLOYABLE

MRC 1 – <7 DAY PROFILES

MRC 2 – HEARING/VISION/DNA/HIV/IMMUNIZATIONS/GLASSES/TEMPORARY 7 DAYS-14 DAYS

 

NON-DEPLOYABLE

MRC 3 – PROFILE >14 DAYS/CLASS 3 DENTAL/PREGNANT/PERMANENT PROFILE

MRC 4 – UNKNOWN MED READINESS/PHA >15 MONTHS/DENTAL CLASS 4

 

MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY

Single biggest health problem of the U.S. Military: – Almost 1⁄2 of services members are injured annually

  • Most injuries
    – Muscle strains – Joint Sprains
    – Stress Fractures
  • Injured Areas:
    – Lower Extremities: ankle/foot, knee/lower leg – Lower Back
    – Shoulders/Upper Back
  • Most Common Causes:
    – Running and Physical Training

 

 

 

Injuries:

ACUTE – Immediate; fractures

OVERUSE – Caused from small forces over time

As an MFT we never know what our Commander’s may want us to do or what type of population we will be expected to help maintain/reach/rehab/etc.

 


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